A sailboat is covered in lights outside of a Route 6A photo studio.


Somewhere a library is missing its lions.


A congregation of statues of St. Francis of Assisi holds a prayer meeting.


The flower stand holds an abundance of colorful summer blossoms.


Willow Bend Antique Shop displays its wares out in front.



This well is known locally as "The Egg".


Colorful enamel colanders hang in the Cook Shop window.


The colors of the sunset shone through the trees.


Paine's Creek was ablaze with color in the autumn.


The Edward Snow House dates back to around 1700 and is now Countryside Antique Shop.


Pepper House Inn is a hip roof colonial along Route 6A.


Brewster Coffee Shop is a local gathering spot.


Kids can learn to sail at Brewster Sea Camp.


The last weekend of April is the Brewster in Bloom Festival. Magnolias, forsythia, and daffodils predominate. The entire length of the front yard of this home was lined with daffodils and forsythia.


A beautiful pink magnolia stands beside the Old Manse.


Naturalized daffodils are abundant in this garden beside the Immaculate Conception Chapel.


The gardens and magnolia were in full bloom outside the First Church of Christ Scientist.


Here is a closer look at a lovely white magnolia.


The Brewster Inn and Chowder House is typical of the Victorian style of many of the homes in Brewster.


Unusual antique flower containers are sold at the McLoud House.


Brewster by the Sea is one of the Bed and Breakfasts and Inns that are open for tours during the weekend.


A fanciful group of ladies enjoys tea on the lawn of Michael's Cottages.


It is unusual to see all white daffodils along a fence.


This roadside flower stand operates on the honor system.


Weathervanes and lions are among the collections of this antique shop.


The sands of low tide at Ellis Landing shone in the late afternoon sun.


These shells are from a small razor clam.


The Candleberry Inn is a former clipper ship captain's home.


Satucket Farm is bright with the colors of spring flowers.


Our Lady of the Cape Church was rebuilt and the new building dedicated on May 2, 2004.



The renovations include this vivid stained glass window.



This lovely home was built in 1799 with lumber brought from Russia by the current owner's great great grandfather, Captain Isaac Clark. He was the first captain ever to fly the new American flag in the White Sea.
The Town Fathers of Brewster met here in 1802 to sign the Articles of Separation, petitioning that the town be split off from Harwich.


The herring run was snowy in mid-February.
In late April, the alewife are plentiful.


The Stoneybrook Grist Mill ground corn using a water-powered paddle wheel.


The sound of waves lapping against the shore is a very relaxing sound. When they are silenced, frozen for the first time in twenty years, as they are here at Saints Landing, it is very eerie.
A skate egg case, popularly known as a mermaid's purse, lies on the beach.


This serene scene is at Paines Creek.
The goldenrod is a striking contrast to the water.


The clouds made a dramatic sunset at Paines Creek Beach.


The Underground Gallery was built in 1988, toward the end of the time when people actively sought alternative energy sources.
The Brewster Store opened in 1866 but was originally built as a Unitarian church, the steeple of which was removed. The original shopkeeper was also the postmaster and the post office was part of the store.


The Captain Freeman Inn is behind the store.

At the workshop of Sydenstricker Glass, partner Lincoln Pope demonstrated the process of making one of their beautiful plates. They begin with a circle of windowpane glass. They select from the 350 hand-mixed colors of powdered glass. Each design takes between one and twenty two hand-cut stencils. The powdered glass is carefully sprinkled on the stencils using a fine sieve. When the design is complete, a second circle of glass is placed over it and it is placed on one of their ceramic molds. They make their molds by pouring a slip into a wooden mold box. The plate and mold are fired in one of their custom designed kilns which are controlled either by eye or by computer. After it cools, it is placed on their warehouse racks before being washed and brought up to be displayed in their shop.

See the process of creating one of these beautiful plates.
Click the photo at right to view it on your iPhone or iPad. Or view the larger flash slideshow on your Mac or PC.

 



The Jolly Whaler Cottages served vacationers for decades before they were demolished.


The wild asters near this fence remind me of a painting by Andrew Wyeth.


This windmill stands in Drummer Boy Park.


The New England Fire and History Museum is a short way down the street.
The Cape Cod Natural History Museum and trails are open for the season.


This horse chestnut tree stands majestically beside Route 6A.

Its blossoms are quite delicate.

A tire swing awaits a rider in front of the Latham School.

The Brewster Ladies' Library is an unusual building, painted in authentic Victorian colors, along Route 6A.

The First Parish of Brewster Universalist Unitarian Church was founded in 1700.

The Brewster Council on Aging is housed in a former Town Hall.

Another former Town Hall is now a dentists' office.


This Victorian house is a lawyer's office.

This house is rather unusual in its proportions.


The Old Manse had lovely chrysanthemums out front.

The First Baptist Church of Brewster was founded in 1824.


The Chatham Chorale held their reunion concert in the church.
The Captain Freeman Perry House is now an antique shop.

Ocean Edge Resort was formerly a retreat facility owned by the LaSallette Fathers.

The Crosby Mansion, with 35 rooms and 17 fireplaces, was a popular venue for weddings and other functions. It has also served as an arts school, a restaurant, and a weight loss camp.


The Friends of Crosby Mansion held an open house on the Fourth of July. Click the photo for a tour of Tawasentha.

Nearby is the Cape Repertory Theater.
Chillingsworth is a French restaurant in a 300 year old farmhouse.

Nickerson State Park is a great place for camping.


We visited friends who spent the summer in a trailer in Sweetwater Forest Campground. This mourning dove was well camouflaged on the ground.
A plate of watermelon made a refreshing dessert after our cookout.

Click the name of the town to see photos